Last edited by Sajas
Tuesday, April 21, 2020 | History

2 edition of Draft recovery plan for the prairie species of western Oregon and southwestern Washington found in the catalog.

Draft recovery plan for the prairie species of western Oregon and southwestern Washington

Draft recovery plan for the prairie species of western Oregon and southwestern Washington

Fender"s blue butterfly (icaricia icarioides fenderi), erigeron decumbens var. decumbens (Willamette daisy), lomatium bradshawii (Bradshaw"s lomatium), lupinus sulphureus ssp. kincaidii (Kincaid"s lupine), sidalcea nelsoniana (Nelson"s checker-mallow)

by

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  • 34 Currently reading

Published by Region 1, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in Portland, Or .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Endangered plants -- Oregon,
  • Endangered plants -- Washington (State),
  • Wildlife recovery -- Oregon,
  • Wildlife recovery -- Washington (State),
  • Plant conservation -- Oregon,
  • Plant conservation -- Washington (State)

  • Edition Notes

    StatementRegion 1, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.
    ContributionsU.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Region 1.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsQK86.U6 D73 2008
    The Physical Object
    Pagination1 v. (various pagings) :
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL23151286M
    LC Control Number2008412951

    William is the author of the recently published book The Guide to Butterflies of Oregon and Washington (Westcliffe Publishers, ). William showed slides of many native Oregon butterflies at various life stages, and discussed different life history adaptations of different species. April Hay, O.P. Two New Species of Fossil Turtles from Oregon. University of California Publications: Bulletin of the Department Geology. 3(10): pp Hays, David W., Kelly R. McAllister, Scott A. Richardson, and Derek W. Stinson. Washington State Recovery Plan for the Western Pond Turtle.


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Draft recovery plan for the prairie species of western Oregon and southwestern Washington Download PDF EPUB FB2

The prairie species addressed in this recovery plan occur on upland prairies and grasslands, and in wet prairies that range from southwestern Washington south through the Willamette Valley and into the Umpqua Valley in Oregon.

They are all threatened by the continued degradation, loss, and fragmentation of their native prairie ecosystems. The U.S. Fish Draft recovery plan for the prairie species of western Oregon and southwestern Washington book Wildlife Service announces the availability of the draft Recovery Plan for the Prairie Species of Western Oregon and Southwestern Washington for public review and comment.

The listed species addressed in the recovery plan are: Fender's blue butterfly (Icaricia icarioides. Cascadia Prairie Oak Partnership» Recovery Plan for Prairie Species of Western Oregon and Southwestern Washington. Recovery Plan for Prairie Species of Western Oregon and Southwestern Washington.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service released a final recovery plan to address the survival needs of 13 rare species (two butterflies and 11 plants) native to the prairies of Oregon’s Willamette and Umpqua Valleys and southwestern Washington.

Draft recovery plan for the prairie species of western Oregon and southwestern Washington: Fender's blue butterfly (Icaricia icarioides fenderi), Erigeron decumbens var. decumbens (Willamette daisy), Lomatium bradshawii (Bradshaw's lomatium), Lupinus sulphureus ssp. kincaidii (Kincaid's lupine), Sidalcea nelsoniana (Nelson's checker-mallow).

We, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, announce the availability of the approved Recovery Plan for the Prairie Species of Western Oregon and Southwestern Washington.

The recovery plan addresses three endangered and three threatened species. This plan includes recovery objectives and criteria, and specific recovery actions necessary to achieve downlisting and delisting of the species. Recovery Plan for Prairie Species of Western Oregon and Southwestern Oregon.

Washington Biodiversity Council. December Washington Biodiversity Conservation Strategy: Sustaining Our Natural Heritage.

Washington's Comprehensive Wildlife Conservation Strategy. NATURE CONSERVANCY PROGRAMATIC REPORTS. Fort Lewis and. A U.S.

Fish and Wildlife Service Recovery Plan for prairie species of western Oregon and southwestern Washington (pdf document, MB) was released in and addresses conservation needs of Bradshaw’s desert parsley.

Draft Recovery Plan for the Prairie Species of Western Oregon and Southwestern Washington. Fender’s blue butterfly (Icaricia icarioides fenderi), Erigeron decumbens. The Oregon Fish and Wildlife Commission provided comments on the Plan at it’s Dec.

3, meeting in Portland and adopted the Plan at it’s August 5, meeting. Extensive stakeholder participation, scientific and public review, and plan revision occurred during development of the Upper Willamette River Plan.

Species/Units covered. Providing Native Plant Diversity to the Willamette Valley Ecoregion No-tech, low-tech, and old-tech seed production methods. Draft Recovery Plan for Prairie Species of Western Oregon and Southwestern Washington. Recovery plan for the prairie species of western Oregon and southwestern Washington: Fender's blue butterfly (icaricia icarioides fenderi), erigeron decumbens var.

decumbens (Willamette daisy), lomatium bradshawii (Bradshaw's lomatium), lupinus sulphureus ssp. kincaidii (Kincaid's lupine), sidalcea nelsoniana (Nelson's checker-mallow). Final Recovery Plan for the Prairie Species of Western Oregon and Southwestern Washington: View Implementation Progress 06/29/ F: Pacific Region: E: Hawaiian picture-wing fly -- Wherever found Drosophila sharpi: Draft Kauai Islandwide Recovery Plan.

Attachment #2, Draft Conservation Strategy Format - File - K; Attachment #3, Peer Review Process - File - 20K; Habitat Types. Recovery Plan for the Prairie Species of Western Oregon and Southwestern Washington, May - File.

Inthe U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service developed a recovery plan for grassland-dependent species that occur in western Oregon and southwestern Washington.

It provides recovery goals and conservation strategies for several Strategy Species in the Willamette Valley. Thorpe, A.S, and T.N. Kaye. Erigeron decumbens ssp. decumbens (Willamette daisy): population monitoring and evaluation of mowing and burning at.

species. Herbivory of peacock larkspur by rodents, deer, and slugs has been documented, and hybridization with other Delphinium species (especially D.

menziesii) poses a potential threat to the genetic integrity of peacock larkspur. Conservation planning A U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Recovery Plan for prairie species of western Oregon and. linked to the draft Recovery Plan for Western Oregon and Southwestern Washington Prairies. Habitat at Lupine Meadows will be managed for high species diversity as a quality example of a Willamette Valley prairie.

Acceptable levels of public access may include a trail through the property, occasional tours, restoration activities and.

Final Recovery Plan for the Prairie Species of Western Oregon and Southwestern Washington: F: 1: Oregon Fish and Wildlife Office () Fender's blue butterfly: Icaricia icarioides fenderi: 1: Attempt to locate additional populations of Fender's blue butterfly by surveying suitable habitats in areas not currently known to.

The subsequent recovery plan (Recovery Plan for the Prairie Species of Western Oregon and Southwestern Washington, ) has reinforced the work of numerous agencies, nonprofits, and private landowners who dedicate time, energy, land, resources, and funding to maintain and expand the prairies that serve as home to the Fender’s blue butterfly and its larval host plant.

The recovery plan identifies western gray squirrel recovery areas and interim recovery objectives for these areas. The recovery plan outlines strategies intended to restore a viable western gray squirrel population in the South Cascade Recovery Area and increase and maintain populations in the Puget Trough and North Cascades recovery areas.

Southwestern Washington Prairies: Using GIS to find rare plant habitat in historic prairies. More than 99% of the grasslands of southwestern Washington (Clark, Lewis, and Cowlitz Counties) have been converted to agriculture and other uses.

Decisions ofthe RMP will be consistent with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Recovery Plan for the Prairie Species of Western Oregon and Southwestern Washington. Scoping comments can be submitted by mail to: Richard Hardt, Planning and Environmental Coordinator, to. The USFWS is currently preparing a draft recovery plan for four threatened and endangered prairie species in western Oregon and southwest Washington (USFWS ).

One of the most important conservation actions identified in the plan is evaluating the status of extant populations for each prairie species. The success of trained dogs in a.

Recovery Plan for the Prairie Species of Western Oregon and Southwestern Washington. The comment for the Draft RMP/Draft EIS is scheduled for 90 days beginning Octo Comments can be submitted by any of the following methods: • Email: [email protected] • Fax: () • Mail: P.O.

BoxEugene, Oregon. Southwest Washington Prairie Species Natural Heritage Report Prepared by Rex C. Crawford Ma Support objectives outlined in the Recovery Plan for individual southwest Recovery Plan for Prairie Species of Western Oregon and southwestern Washington.

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Portland, Oregon. The language of the ESA and much subsequent agency practice emphasize an overarching goal of recovery of species and ecosystems in the wild (16 U.S.C. §[a][3], see Supporting Information S1 for references to a goal of self‐sustaining populations in recovery plans).

In the case Trout Unlimited by: YSWCD, DRAFT Yamhill Habitat Conservation Plan for Fender’s Blue Butterfly on Private Lands () Yamhill County, County Roads Habitat Conservation Plan for Fender’s Blue Butterfly () USFWS, Recovery Plan for the Prairie Species of Western Oregon and Southwestern Washington.

USFWS [U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service] Draft recovery plan for the prairie species of western Oregon and southwestern Washington. Published Septem Region 1 U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Portland, OR. Historically, this species was broadly distributed in the northeastern United States and adjacent Canada, in the eastern temperate and boreal forest regions, north to southern Quebec, Ontario, and Maine; south in a narrow band along the Appalachian Mountains to the northeast corner of Georgia, and west to the margin of the Great Plains in eastern North Dakota, South Dakota.

The Coyote Oaks property will benefit many priority habitats and species identified in the Oregon Conservation Strategy, Willamette Valley Synthesis, and the USFWS Recovery Plan for Prairie Species of Western Oregon and Southwestern Washington.

These include Willamette daisy, Western Meadowlark, Slender-billed Nuthatch, cutthroat trout, and. The preliminary draft Recovery Plan for the Prairie Species of Western Oregon and Southwestern Washington (USFWS, unpublished) notes that habitat quality is linked to the diversity of native plants.

This diversity will attract and maintain pollinator populations, which, in turn, helps maintain self-sustaining plant populations.

prairie species. The methods, strategies, and framework of each are in lock-step with the other, leaving little doubt that FWS will be ready and willing to rubber stamp “AP-PROVED” on the Benton HCP application.

Draft Recovery Plan for the Prairie Species of Western Oregon and Southwestern Washington. forb species. Recently, however, restora-tion professionals have emphasized much higher levels of diversity in restoration projects. The preliminary draft Recovery Plan for the Prairie Species of Western Oregon and Southwestern Washington (USFWS,unpublished) notes that habitat quality is linked to the diversity of native plants.

Cover page from the Draft Willamette Subbasin Plan document: Image: Cover of the Recovery Plan for the Prairie Species of Western Oregon and Southwestern Washington document: Slide (no title) Image: Photograph of rolling. Wiles, G. Periodic status review for the western gray squirrel in Washington.

Washington Depart-ment of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, Washington. 19 + iii pp. Cover photos by Rod Gilbert (western gray squirrel, inset) and Mary Linders (western gray squirrel habitat on Joint Base Lewis-McChord). This is a widespread northern and western cuckoo bumble bee.

It is transcontinental ranging from Alaska south to New Mexico and the Sky Islands of Arizona (Schmidt and Jacobson ) and New Mexico and east to the Canadian Great Plains, Ontario boreal forest and maritime northeastern United States and eastern Canada (Williams et al.

for three oak-associated species in the Willamette Valley) Federal Regis (October 31): – –––––– Draft recovery plan for the prairie species of western Oregon and southwestern Washington Portland, OR: USFWS. Simple population models are increasingly being used to predict extinction risk using historical abundance estimates.

A very simple model, the stochastic exponential growth (SEG) model, is Cited by: 3. Most prairie-oak habitat in the Pacific Northwest occurs in valley floors and foothills, which coincide with the initially settled, most heavily populated, and most rapidly developing portions of southwestern British Columbia and western Washington and Oregon (Franklin and Dyrness ).

Development and land use pressures have been and continue Cited by: trap, capture, or collect the species or to involve it in interstate or foreign commerce. There are only 2, known pairs of northern spotted owls, which can be found in old-growth forest from southwestern British Columbia, western Washington state, western Oregon, and northwestern California south to San Francisco Bay, with the.

Washington, describes factors affecting the population and its habitat, and prescribes strategies to recover the species in Washington. The draft state recovery plan for the lynx was reviewed by researchers and state and federal agencies. This review was followed by a 90 day public comment period.

All comments received were considered. Kincaid’s lupine flowering at Fir Butte. Kincaid’s lupine (Lupinus oreganus), a rare species native to prairies of western Oregon and southwestern Washington, is a host for the endangered Fender’s blue butterfly (Icaricia icarioides fenderi).

As such, Kincaid’s lupine has become the focus of restoration efforts throughout its range.In Oregon, overall losses of tidal wetlands since the ’s are estimated at 70% (ChristyGoodBoule and BierlyThomas ), supporting the need [ ] Draft management plan/environmental assessment for the French Flat Area of .